Appliance Power Usage

Appliance Power Usage Table

If you are looking to supply an area with Solar Power Energy and are wondering how much power you need, what sized solar panel to get and which appliances you can run on a particular set up, then you have come to the right place. We have taken average power consumption figures of popular appliances and listed them in the table below. This table shows many usefula appliances you may wish to power with a solar power supply, along with the power they use in Watts.

The following information is to be used as a rough guide. As every appliance varies accross makes and brands it is impossible to provide exact figures. As a result, we offer this information to allow you to estimate your intended power usage for your Solar Powered setup. If you would like more precise figures, then please check the manual and power information plates of your appliances themselves. This will give you a more accurate figure.

Kitchen (w)

Office (w)

DIY (w)

Coffee Pot – 200 Laptop Computer – 20-50 Weeder – 500
Coffee Maker – 800 Desktop Computer – 80 – 150 Hedge Trimmer – 450
Toaster – 800-1500 Printer – 100 1/4″ Drill – 250
Popcorn Popper – 250 Scanner – 14 1/2″ Drill – 750
Blender – 300 Shredder – 100 1″ Drill – 1000
Microwave – 600-1500 Hard Drive – 15 8 1/4″ Circ. Saw – 1400
Waffle Iron – 1200 Typewriter – 80-200 9″ Disc Sander – 1200
Hot plate – 1200 Ceiling Fan – 10-50 3″ Belt Sander – 1000
Frying Pan – 1200 Table Fan – 10-25 12″ Chain Saw – 1100
Dishwasher – 1200-1500 Electric Clock – 3 14″ Band Saw – 1100
Gbg. Disposal – 450 Answering Machine – 10 7 1/4″ Circ. Saw – 900
Fridge Freezer – 200-400 Electric Pencil Sharpener – 100 Electric Mower (n/a) – 1500
Food Blender – 350 Wireless Router – 7 AC Grinder 1/2 hp – 1080
Electric Whisk – 120

 

Utility (w)

Home Media (w)

Other (w)

Handheld Vaccuum – 100 TV (47″ Plasma) – 250-450 Clock Radio – 1
Upright Vaccuum – 200-700 TV (47″ LCD) – 125-200 Electric Blanket – 200
Iron – 1000 TV (47″ LED) – 90-150 Portable Heater- 1500
Sewing Machine – 100 CD Player – 35 Garage Door Opener – 350
Washing Machine – 300-500 Portable Stereo – 10-30 Waterbed – 400
Clothes Dryer – 4000 Satelite – 30 Car Stereo – 8
Air Conditioner (n/a)… DVD Player – 60 Shaver – 15
Air Con Room – 1000 Projector – 120-200 Guitar Amplifier – 40
Hair Dryer – 1000 DVR – 33 Synthezier – 30
Hair Straighteners – 80 HI-FI – 30 Games Console – 190
Hair Curlers – 750 VCR – 30 Cinema Amplifier – 800

 

How To Calculate Power Requirements

Make a note of up to 5 appliances from the above table, then next to each appliance, note how many hours you intend to use that item for each day. Now multiply the Watts by the hours for each appliance and then add all of these totals together. This will give you your total Watts Per Hour requirement from your Solar Power Supply. An example is shown below.

 

Appliance

Watts

Hours of Use

Watts/Hour

(Watts x Hours)

Answering Machine 10 2 20
Laptop Computer 50 3 150
Clock Radio 1 24 24
Total Watts Per Hour Required 194

 

Efficiency Buffer

Now, with this Total of 194 W/hr we find it safest to multiply it by 1.2, in order to account for up to 20% loss of power in the system, just to account for any unforseen circumstances and natural system losses. It will also provide a buffer of extra charge in the battery.

Watts/hr

Buffer Multiplier

Final Power Requirement

194 x 1.2 233 W/hr

 

So Which Solar Power Kit Do I Need?

The average number of useful hours of daylight each day in the UK varies throughout the season. This will have an impact on how much power your Solar Panel will capture and store in your Solar Power Supply. As a result, it is worth thinking about when you are most likely to use the Solar Power Supply and stock up accordingly. The table below gives the average daylight hours which will charge your solar panel. If you would like a yearly average, use the figure of 4.5 Hours as a rough guide, but only if you are intending on using this set up during the dark winter months, otherwise this will give a misleadingly high result.

Month Average Peak Sun Hours Per MonthUK Met Office Data 2000 – 2010
January 2 Hours
February 3 Hours
March 4 Hours
April 6 Hours
May 6 Hours
June 7 Hours
July 7 Hours
August 6 Hours
September 5 Hours
October 4 Hours
November 3 Hours
December 2 Hours
Yearly Average 4.5 Hours

With the table above, with each month you intend on using your Solar Power Supply, divide your Final Power Requirement from above by the number of hours of daylight for that month. This will give you the Wattage of the Solar Power Supply you will need to run your appliances for the required time that month. Choose a Solar Power Kit with a Wattaghe as close to the result you have calculated. Usually, we would advise rounding up to the nearest Power Supply, to ensure that you are able to use your appliances for the intended amount of time.

Month

Daylight Hrs

Power Consumption

Solar Power Kit Required

March 4 Hrs 233 W/hr / 4Hrs 60 Watts
June 7 Hrs 233 W/hr / 7Hrs 30 Watts
August 6 Hrs 233 W/hr / 6Hrs 40 Watts

So, In our example above, we would be looking for a Solar Power Set Up which can provide 50-60 Watts in order to run our example appliances. Our 50W Solar Panels should do fine for this.

Our Solar Panels can be Found Here:

Our Solar Power Kits Can Be Found Here:

 



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